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Curriculum Map 1st Nine Weeks

Curriculum Map

Common Core Standards

Fulton Independent School District

 

 

Subject/Course:

Biology

Grade:

10

Revision Date:

July 30, 2015

 

Timeline

(Days or weeks/dates)

Kentucky Core Assessment

Standard

Learning Target

Introduce

Progressing

Master

Review

On Going

(all must get to  “M”)

Assessment

Lesson/Content

Common Core Standard(s) from an Earlier Grade/course that Was/Were no Part of Core content 4.1

2 Weeks

3.4.2

Students will understand that most cell functions involve chemical reactions. Food molecules taken into cells react to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules. Both breakdown and synthesis are made possible by a large set of protein catalysts, called enzymes. The breakdown of some of the food molecules enables the cell to store energy in specific chemicals that are used to carry out the many functions of the cell.

 

3.4.3

  • describe cell regulation (enzyme function, diffusion, osmosis, homeostasis);
  • predict consequences of internal/external environmental change on cell function/regulation.

Cell functions are regulated. Regulation occurs both through changes in the activity of the functions performed by proteins and through selective expression of individual genes. This regulation allows cells to respond to their internal and external environments and to control and coordinate cell growth and division.

3.5.2

  • predict the success of patterns of adaptive behaviors based on evidence/data;
  • justify explanations of organism survival based on scientific understandings of behavior.

The broad patterns of behavior exhibited by organisms have changed over time through natural selection to ensure reproductive success. Organisms often live in unpredictable environments, so their behavioral responses must be flexible enough to deal with uncertainty and change. Behaviors often have an adaptive logic.

 

I can:

*Define Biology

*Identify possible benefits from studying biology.

*Summarize the characteristics of living things.

*Explain the characteristics of science.

*Compare something that is scientific with something that is pseudoscientific.

*Describe the importance of the metric system and SI.

*Describe the difference in an observation and an inference.

*Differentiate among control, independent & dependent variables.

*Identify the scientific methods a biologist uses for research.

 

Review

Formative:

-Science Assessment Probes (1 pre and 1 post)

-Vocabulary exercise

-Reading and note-taking supplement

-vocabulary quiz

-practice pages

-lab safety video

-lab (progressive growth indicator)

 

Summative:

Final Assessment

Intro to Biology

 

  1. Note taking/Lecture with discussion of each section
  2. Reading Sections
  3. Section Reviews
  4. Chapter Review with Reteaching
  5. Study Guide
  6. Discussion of lab safety with video
  7. Lab with modeling and guidance
  8. Review for summative assessment
  9. Summative assessment

 

3 weeks

 

SC-HS-4.7.1

Students will:

  • analyze relationships and interactions among organisms in ecosystems;
  • predict the effects on other organisms of changes to one or more components of the ecosystem.

Organisms both cooperate and compete in ecosystems. Often changes in one component of an ecosystem will have effects on the entire system that are difficult to predict. The interrelationships and interdependencies of these organisms may generate ecosystems that are stable for hundreds or thousands of years.

 

 

SC-HS-4.7.2

Students will:

  • evaluate proposed solutions from multiple perspectives to environmental problems caused by human interaction;
  • justify positions using evidence/data.

Human beings live within the world's ecosystems. Human activities can deliberately or inadvertently alter the dynamics in ecosystems. These activities can threaten current and future global stability and, if not addressed, ecosystems can be irreversibly affected.

DOK 3

SC-HS-4.7.3

Students will:

predict the consequences of changes to any component (atmosphere, solid Earth, oceans, living things) of the Earth System;

propose justifiable solutions to global problems.

Interactions among the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere and living things have resulted in the ongoing development of a changing Earth system.

DOK 3

 

 

 

 

I can:

*Explain the difference between abiotic factors and biotic factors.

*Describe the levels of biological organization.

*Differentiate between an organism’s habitat and its niche.

*Describe the flow of energy through an ecosystem.

*Identify the ultimate energy source for photosynthetic producers.

*Describe food chains, food webs, and pyramid models.

*Describe how nutrients move through the biotic and abiotic parts of an ecosystem.

*Explained importance of nutrients to living organisms.

*Compare the biogeochemical cycle of nutrients.

*Recognize how unfavorable abiotic and biotic factors affect a species.

*Describe how ranges of tolerance affect the distribution of organisms.

*Sequence the stages of primary and secondary succession.

*Relate latitude and the three major climate zones.

*Describe the major abiotic factors that determine the location of a terrestrial biome.

*Distinguish among terrestrial biomes based on climate and biotic factors.

*Identify the major abiotic factors that determine the aquatic ecosystems.

*Recognize that freshwater ecosystems are characterized by depth and ea\water flow.

*Identify transitional aquatic ecosystems and their importance.

*Distinguish the zones of marine ecosystems.

 

 

Review

Formative:

-Science Assessment Probes (1 pre and 1 post)

-Vocabulary exercise

-Reading and note-taking supplement

-vocabulary quiz

-practice pages

-lab (progressive growth indicator)

 

Summative:

Final Assessment

Ecology

 

  1. Note taking/Lecture with discussion of each section
  2. Reading Sections
  3. Section Reviews
  4. Chapter Review with Reteaching
  5. Study Guide
  6. Lab with modeling and guidance
  7. Review for summative assessment
  8. Summative assessment

 

2 Weeks

3.5.1

  • predict the impact on species of changes to 1) the potential for a species to increase its numbers, (2) the genetic variability of offspring due to mutation and recombination of genes, (3) a finite supply of the resources required for life, or (4) natural selection;
  • propose solutions to real-world problems of endangered and extinct species.

Species change over time. Biological change over time is the consequence of the interactions of (1) the potential for a species to increase its numbers, (2) the genetic variability of offspring due to mutation and recombination of genes, (3) a finite supply of the resources required for life and (4) natural selection. The consequences of change over time provide a scientific explanation for the fossil record of ancient life forms and for the striking molecular similarities observed among the diverse species of living organisms. Changes in DNA (mutations) occur spontaneously at low rates. Some of these changes make no difference to the organism, whereas others can change cells and organisms. Only mutations in germ cells have the potential to create the variation that changes an organism’s future offspring.

3.5.2

  • predict the success of patterns of adaptive behaviors based on evidence/data;
  • justify explanations of organism survival based on scientific understandings of behavior.

The broad patterns of behavior exhibited by organisms have changed over time through natural selection to ensure reproductive success. Organisms often live in unpredictable environments, so their behavioral responses must be flexible enough to deal with uncertainty and change. Behaviors often have an adaptive logic.

4.7.1

  • analyze relationships and interactions among organisms in ecosystems;
  • predict the effects on other organisms of changes to one or more components of the ecosystem.

Organisms both cooperate and compete in ecosystems. Often changes in one component of an ecosystem will have effects on the entire system that are difficult to predict. The interrelationships and interdependencies of these organisms may generate ecosystems that are stable for hundreds or thousands of years.

4.7.3

predict the consequences of changes to any component (atmosphere, solid Earth, oceans, living things) of the Earth System;

propose justifiable solutions to global problems.

Interactions among the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere and living things have resulted in the ongoing development of a changing Earth system.

4.7.5

  • predict the consequences of changes in resources to a population;
  • select or defend solutions to real-world problems of population control.

Living organisms have the capacity to produce populations of infinite size. However, behaviors, environments and resources influence the size of populations. Models (e.g., mathematical, physical, conceptual) can be used to make predictions about changes in the size or rate of growth of a population.

 

I will:

*Describe the characteristics of populations.

*Understand the concepts of carrying capacity and limiting factors.

*Describe the ways in which populations are distributed.

*Explain the trends in human population growth.

*Compare the age structure of representative no growing, slowly growing, and rapidly growing countries.

*Predict the consequences of continued population growth.

*Describe three types of biodiversity.

*Explain the importance of biodiversity.

*Summarize the direct and indirect value of biodiversity.

*Describe the biodiversity crisis.

*Explain the factors that threaten biodiversity.

*Describe how the decline of a single species can affect an entire ecosystem.

*Describe two classes of natural resources.

*Identify methods used to conserve biodiversity.

*Explain two techniques used to restore biodiversity.

Review

Formative:

-Science Assessment Probes (1 pre and 1 post)

-Vocabulary exercise

-Reading and note-taking supplement

-vocabulary quiz

-practice pages

-lab (progressive growth indicator)

 

Summative:

Final Assessment

  Populations/Conservation

 

  1. Note taking/Lecture with discussion of each section
  2. Reading Sections
  3. Section Reviews
  4. Chapter Review with Reteaching
  5. Study Guide
  6. Lab with modeling and guidance
  7. Review for summative assessment
  8. Summative assessment

 

2 Weeks

3.4.2

Students will understand that most cell functions involve chemical reactions. Food molecules taken into cells react to provide the chemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules. Both breakdown and synthesis are made possible by a large set of protein catalysts, called enzymes. The breakdown of some of the food molecules enables the cell to store energy in specific chemicals that are used to carry out the many functions of the cell.

3.4.3

  • describe cell regulation (enzyme function, diffusion, osmosis, homeostasis);
  • predict consequences of internal/external environmental change on cell function/regulation.

Cell functions are regulated. Regulation occurs both through changes in the activity of the functions performed by proteins and through selective expression of individual genes. This regulation allows cells to respond to their internal and external environments and to control and coordinate cell growth and division.

 

3.4.6

Students will understand that in all organisms and viruses, the instructions for specifying the characteristics are carried in nucleic acids. The chemical and structural properties of nucleic acids determine how the genetic information that underlies heredity is both encoded in genes and replicated.

 

I can:

*Identify the particles that make up atoms.

*Diagram the particles that make up an atom.

*Compare covalent bonds and ionic bonds.

*Describe van der Walls forces.

*Identify the parts of a chemical reaction.

*Relate energy changes to chemical reactions.

*Summarize the importance of enzymes in living organisms.

*Evaluate how the structure of water makes it a good solvent.

*Compare and contrast solutions and suspensions.

*Describe the difference between acids and bases.

*Describe the role of carbon in living organisms.

*Summarize the four major families of biological macromolecules.

*Compare the functions of each group of biological macromolecules.

 

Review

Formative:

-Science Assessment Probes (1 pre and 1 post)

-Vocabulary exercise

-Reading and note-taking supplement

-vocabulary quiz

-practice pages

-lab (progressive growth indicator)

 

Summative:

Final Assessment

Populations/Conservation

 

  1. Note taking/Lecture with discussion of each section
  2. Reading Sections
  3. Section Reviews
  4. Chapter Review with Reteaching
  5. Study Guide
  6. Lab with modeling and guidance
  7. Review for summative assessment
  8. Summative assessment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fulton Independent School  |  304 West State Line   |  Fulton, KY 42041